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UNESCO Working Paper Series on Mobile Learning

Today there are over 5.9 billion mobile phone subscriptions worldwide, and for every one person who accesses the internet from a computer two do so from a mobile device. Given the ubiquity and rapidly expanding functionality of mobile technologies, UNESCO is enthusiastic about their potential to improve and facilitate learning, particularly in communities where educational opportunities are scarce. This Working Paper Series scans the globe to illuminate the ways in which mobile technologies can be used to support the United Nations Education for All Goals; respond to the challenges of particular educational contexts; supplement and enrich formal schooling; and make learning more accessible, equitable, personalized and flexible for students everywhere.

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/themes/icts/m4ed/mobile-learning-res...


Turning on Mobile Learning in Latin America: Illustrative Initiatives and Policy Implications

This paper, part of the UNESCO Working Paper Series on Mobile Learning, describes a range of mobile learning programs and explores how these programs address educational needs in the region. It also surveys national and local policies related to mobile learning and analyzes their impact.

The paper reveals that many Latin American governments have sidelined education initiatives that use or call for mobile phones because they have already made substantial investments in one laptop per child (or 1:1) programs. For example, Argentina, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela all have national and mature 1:1 laptop programs, and many students in these countries use school purchased laptop computers. By contrast, programs employing mobile devices are nascent at best, particularly at the national level.

http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0021/002160/216080E.pdf


Mobile Learning for Teachers in Latin America: Exploring the Potential of Mobile Technologies to Support Teachers and improve Practice

This paper, part of the UNESCO Working Paper Series on Mobile Learning, looks at how mobile devices are being used, or could be used, to support the work of teachers and enhance their professional development.

The paper devotes significant space to contrasting two major initiatives: Bridge IT and EMIA-SMILE. Both seek to improve teaching and learning practices in classrooms. Interestingly though, the initiatives rely on very different approaches. The BridgeIT project focuses heavily on training teachers to plan lessons that employ interactive and student-centred learning activities. Mobile devices—equipped with a library of videos aligned to particular subject curriculums—are provided only to teachers. By contrast, the EMIA-SMILE project gives mobile devices directly to small groups of students in order to direct collaborative and inquiry-based learning. The EMIA-SMILE project is less reliant on teachers and, unlike BridgeIT, does not invest substantial resources training them. Instead, the instructional pedagogy is mostly embedded in the mobile devices themselves.

http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0021/002160/216081E.pdf


Turning on Mobile Learning in North America: Illustrative Initiatives and Policy Implications

 

The first of the North America papers describes a number of mobile learning initiatives in schools and universities, surveys existing policies, and explores the implication for revising or creating national, state, district and institutional policies related to mobile learning.

The paper reveals that of the policies that do exist, many are too broad or restrictive to enable mobile learning. An example is the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA), which addresses concerns about access to offensive content over the internet on school and library computers. Since 2001, when rules for implementing CIPA were issued, many district administrators have remained confused about its proper implementation.

http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0021/002160/216083E.pdf


Mobile Learning for Teachers in North America: Exploring the Potential of Mobile Technologies to Support Teachers and Improve Practice

 

The second paper from UNESCO's report on mobile learning in North America looks at the relatively nascent area of how mobiles are being used, or could be used, to support teachers and their professional development. Of particular interest is how mobile access increases opportunities for teachers to participate in online communities of practice, which is a proven way to support teachers. Mobiles also provide a way for teachers to enjoy professional development anytime and anywhere.

The paper found that many teachers are eager to engage in mobile learning for professional development because of the flexibility it provides. Without mobile technologies, participation in professional development necessitates attendance at an event or at least access to a computer; with a mobile device, teachers can access online professional development from any location that has wireless connectivity.

 

http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0021/002160/216084E.pdf


Turning on Mobile Learning: Global Themes

 

Over the past several weeks UNESCO has been publishing individual titles in its Working Paper Series on Mobile Learning.  Recently the Organization concluded the first phase of the Series by releasing two Global Themes papers.  These papers, unlike previous titles, are not region-specific.  Instead they synthesize information contained in the regional papers to identify salient trends that cut across geographic boundaries.  This first paper highlights issues policy makers and other stakeholders should consider when infusing mobile learning into education systems. 

http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0021/002164/216451E.pdf


Mobile Learning for Teachers: Global Themes

 

Over the past several weeks UNESCO has been publishing individual titles in its Working Paper Series on Mobile Learning.  Recently the Organization concluded the first phase of the Series by releasing two Global Themes papers.  These papers, unlike previous titles, are not region-specific.  Instead they synthesize information contained in the regional papers to identify salient trends that cut across geographic boundaries.  This second paper examines characteristics shared by programmes that assist educators, either by aiding their work in schools or by helping them improve their own pedagogical and content knowledge.

 

http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0021/002164/216452E.pdf


State of Mobile Learning in Canada and Future Directions

As Canada moves ahead in the 21st Century it must have a highly educated workforce to remain competitive and to sustain a high quality of life. To attain these important goals, Canada must ensure that all citizens have access to quality education regardless of location and background. At the same time, organizations must provide just-in-time training to employees so that they can keep up to date in their fields to be productive on the job. Educational institutions must meet the needs of the current and the new generations by delivering education for access anywhere and at anytime. To address these needs, organizations and educational institutions should implement mobile learning to enhance flexibility in learning. This is possible thanks to the high penetration of mobile devices amongst Canadians. To help Canada and organizations move forward in implementing mobile learning, a national research study was conducted to determine the current state of mobile learning in Canada and to establish the direction Canada should take in the field of m-learning. The study surveyed and interviewed small, medium, and large organizations from fifteen different sectors across Canada on their use of mobile learning and the future direction in that area. The following are key highlights from the results of the study.

http://www.rogersbizresources.com/files/308/Mobile_Learning_in_Canada_Fi...


GSMA Mobile Proposition for Education Report

This report highlights the value of mobile technologies in supporting enhanced teaching and learning. It describes six key educational scenarios where mobile connectivity can make, and in some cases is making, a contribution. It also describes how mobile network operators could assist the education sector in implementing mobile education through offering a range of connectivity services, learning materials, systems, apps, advice, support and managed services to education sector institutions.

http://www.gsma.com/connectedliving/gsma-mobile-proposition-for-educatio...


Mobile Education in the United States

This document is part of a series of country specific reports which consider the demand for Mobile Education from the formal education sector perspective in each country. In each we describe the delivery models in place for the main types of education along with examples of activities already underway. To date country specific reports have been developed for the United States, United Kingdom, Spain, Japan and France

http://www.gsma.com/connectedliving/mobile-education-in-the-united-states/